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New Twist On The Popular Tech Support Scam Has Surfaced

Posted by Admin on 11/13/2017

Phishing attacks are always evolving and trying to force us into ignoring our own good sense. A common attack is the infamous technical support scam. Historically, this involved a phone call from someone claiming you need help with your computer, an email message that directed users to fake sites where malware was installed, or a fake tech support popup message requesting payment card numbers. While those are still common, Microsoft researchers have discovered a new play on this scam.

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Topics: Fraud & Identity Theft, Fraud and Identity Theft

A Consumer's Guide to Mail Theft Prevention

Posted by Kay K on 10/31/2017

As the holidays draw near, it becomes more common to hear about instances of mail theft, either in your neighborhood or on the news.  Ordering gifts and mailing cards can become a stressful endeavor for both consumers and recipients of mail.  If you’ve ever been a victim of mail theft, chances are you felt invaded and frustrated at the fact that it happened.  Your time becomes personally impacted as you try and figure out who needs to be contacted regarding a missing or stolen package, and there’s also a worry that more than just consumer goods were taken – that identity theft may have occurred, if your personally identifiable information was also compromised during the mail theft incident.

If you’re someone who mails packages, gift cards, or orders goods online for delivery, here are a few mail theft prevention tips to consider.

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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft

Has Your Child Become a Victim of Identity Theft? 1 in 40 Have

Posted by Admin on 9/8/2017

According to the Identity Theft Assistance Center, one in 40 (2.5%) households in the U.S. have a child under 18 who have had personal information compromised by identity theft criminals. Unfortunately, much of the identity theft from children doesn't get discovered until after they are 18 and try to get a loan for school or to buy a home.

Children in lower income households and foster children are disproportionately susceptible to child identity theft. Those victims sometimes have their information used for such things as getting employment or having utilities set up, indicating that a significant number of these are committed by family members or friends of the child. This is referred to as "friendly fraud" and accounts for 27% of the cases.

Here are some tips to help protect the sought after information of children, particularly the social security number and birth date:

  • As you check your own credit report annually, check children's as well with the same detail as your own and work with the reporting agencies to correct information as needed.
  • Regularly review any financial account statements for children and address discrepancies immediately. 
  • Shred all documents with personally identifiable information of children before tossing them.  Use a criss-cross shredder at a minimum.  These can be purchased online or at any office supply store and are only marginally more expensive than the basic shredders and well worth it.
  • Do not carry any social security cards with you, including those of your children.  Keep them locked away in a cabinet at home. While you're at it, put the birth certificates in that locked file as well.
  • If you allow your children to create online accounts, do not let them include their birth date on the forms if possible, but always leave off the date if it's required. Read the privacy policies of any site that will have access to your children's information thoroughly. If it's too invasive, don't allow access.
  • Whenever filling out forms and asked if a child's information can be shared, opt out, even in school directories. These are often posted online and available to the public. 
  • Ask questions of the requestor when providing information about your child. Ask what the information will be used for, if there is some other way to identify your child other than date of birth and social security number, and verify how they protect any information once it is provided to them, including how they discard documents.
  • Place a credit fraud alert on your child's credit report with the three major credit reporting agencies; Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Re-place that alert each time it expires.  There are companies who do this for you, if that is preferred. 

Maryland allows parents to freeze credit of their children until they are of legal age and soon it is expected other states will follow. Some states are looking into legislation allowing parents to enter a child's information into a database for high risk candidates. 

If your child's identity is compromised, document everything including names of people you talk to, dates of conversations, and any contact information for them. Continue doing this for the duration of time it takes to fix the credit or resolve the identity theft issue. Be sure to file a police report with your local law enforcement agency. Also, do the same with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Instructions for filing there are on its website.

Teach your children how to protect their identity, especially online.  Kids are able to have access to the internet from the time they can hold a smart phone, so start early with discussions on protecting themselves and the risks.

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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft, Fraud and Identity Theft

Fraud Alert: “Secret Account” Scams

Posted by Admin on 8/22/2017

Scams that encourage victims to willingly give out their account numbers and personal information are nothing new.  The techniques of the scams, however, do change as people become more aware of current scam trends, which cause scammers to find new ways to prey on their victims.  It is important to stay on top of these trends to avoid falling victim.

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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft

Is Social Media Scamming You? Five Popular Scams and How to Avoid Them

Posted by Admin on 7/20/2017

Cyber criminals will use whatever they can think of to try to get your online banking credentials or other information they can sell on the dark web. Here are five ways they use social media to do it and how you can avoid giving up your information, in no particular order.

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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft

Summer Is For Fishing And Not Phishing

Posted by Admin on 6/30/2017

Summer has arrived all around the northern hemisphere. Many of us prefer to jump up and head outside to enjoy the spoils of the season and that is certainly fantastic. However, scammers don’t honor the seasons. They will try to trick us with their own version of phishing all year round. As we go into relaxation mode, it’s still important to keep an eye out for attempted scams and particularly for the phishing that doesn’t involve a pole, a boat, or water.

Phishing is still the most common way, by far, that information is stolen and .malware makes its way onto computers and mobile devices. It’s worth taking a moment to review the signs that an email message or phone call may be phishing for you

  • A reward is offered, such as a gift card or some other freebie.
  • There is a sense of urgency, such as an account will be blocked or a punishment will occur if you don’t do something.
  • An attachment or link is included in an email that is unexpected or from an unfamiliar sender.
  • There is a request to open a file, click a link, or share something. If a form follows a click that asks for information to be entered or login credentials to be entered, it should be considered suspect.
  • The greeting and message are generic. If it doesn’t have any indication that the sender knows something personally about you, it could be a scam.
  • The sender’s email address is strange or unfamiliar. If you open it up by clicking it, you can see the entire address; not just the name.
  • If a link inside goes to a web address that seems strange or unexpected. If you hover the mouse pointer over those links, you can see where it will take you.
  • A site asks for sensitive information, regardless of how you arrived at it, and the address isn’t preceded by “https:”
  • The caller on the phone starts asking for sensitive information such as passwords, login credentials, or payment card information.
  • A caller tries to scare you into providing or doing something.

Even if none of these indicators are present, it’s not a guarantee that the message is phishing. However, the risk is significantly lower.

It’s unlikely anyone will give up the Internet for the summer, nor is it expected. So just be sure to stay on your game for spotting phishing, so you don’t take the bait.

For additional articles on phishing and more, visit the 
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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft

Ring, Ring?  Keep an Ear Out for these Popular Telephone Scams

Posted by Admin on 4/3/2017

Don’t take the call!  Telephone imposter scams on the rise

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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft, Credit Cards

How to Spot and Stop Employment Scams

Posted by Admin on 2/7/2017



One of the most popular types of fraud is called an employment scam. There are many different types of variations for this scam, but the most common is when a victim is falsely led to believe they have landed their dream job.  After the “employer” hires the victim (with no legal documents signed) they send the victim a counterfeit cashier’s check stating they are going to pay for the equipment that they will need for the job.  They then later claim they over paid and demand that the excess funds are returned. They give the victim a fake account number and instruct them to send the funds electronically via a money transferring service. If the victim falls for the tricks, and sends the funds, they will most likely never see those funds again.  This nightmare becomes reality when the check bounces and the victim is left with the bill.  Once the check bounces, the victim owes the money back to the financial institution.  Often times the victims are truly looking for a job and are already worried about money, so this just compounds the issue.

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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft

Be on the lookout for these frequent tax season schemes and scams.

Posted by Admin on 1/27/2017



If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is! In recent years, thousands of people have lost millions of dollars and their personal information to tax scams and fake IRS communication. This article looks at the scams affecting individuals and businesses and what to do if you if you spot a tax scam.

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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft

Fraud Alert: Holiday fraud is on the rise.

Posted by Brad Blue on 12/22/2016

Fraudsters don’t take vacations for the holidays. In fact, they only have happy holidays if they are successful  in ruining yours! There are three important steps in preventing holiday fraud – let’s call them Ho Ho Ho:

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Topics: Fraud prevention, Fraud & Identity Theft, Fraud and Identity Theft, Holiday Spending

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